Song for Elijah


This song was released on December 8 2017 and is a dedication to Elijah Doughty from Kalgoorlie, WA.

Who is Elijah? Elijah was killed when a car struck the motorbike he was riding in August last year. The driver was going 67 km per hour when he hit Elijah who ‘rolled or tumbled’ under the vehicle.

The driver whose name has been suppressed – probably for his own safety – admitted to driving too closely to the boy but says he hit him because the motorbike veered in front of the car.

The chase began because the motorbike Elijah was riding was stolen from him the previous day. However, there is no evidence Elijah had stolen the bike.

Elijah died from multiple fatal injuries.

Racial tensions in Kalgoorlie erupted after the incident.

A day after the boy was killed a protest occurred outside the Kalgoorlie Courthouse.

Approximately 200 people, some armed with rocks and bottles, broke down the gates of the court and surrounded police; who used pepper spray and riot shields in response.

Twelve police officers were injured during the disorder, with one requiring stitches, while several demonstrators were arrested. Five police cars and a local business were damaged.

Local Indigenous broadcaster Debbie Carmody accused local anti-crime Facebook groups of “inciting violence and murder” against Indigenous youth.

The driver was charged with manslaughter and found not guilty in July. He was convicted of the lesser charge dangerous driving occasioning death.

“This song is a prayer for Elijah that his journey into the Dreaming is guided by the ancestors, and that our love will encompass his family through this time of mourning.” – Archie Roach.

Song for Elijah (Wrap Our Arms Around You) is a message from the Dreaming. It is a track dedicated to a young soul whose love of animals, footy and natural knack for bush mechanics is deeply missed in his community.

The mother of 14-year-old Aboriginal boy Elijah Doughty, whose death ignited protests across the country, has appealed for an end to racial divisions in Australia.

This appeal drew together respected Australian musicians from around the country into a collective project to support Elijah and his family.

“We as singer/songwriters have a voice and in times like this I think we need to use it and give hope to those who think that all hope is lost. The journey to create a ripple for change started with the call out, so many amazing people came on board and over a 6 week period Song for Elijah was conceived.” – Kutcha Edwards.

Musicians involved are – Kutcha Edwards, Archie Roach, Emma Donovan, Radical Son, Tjimba, Possum Burns, Ilana Atkinson, James Henry, David Bridie, and Brendan Gallagher.

Song for Elijah was mixed and mastered by Nao Anzai and Andy Robinson and recorded at Haus Bilas Studios, Melbourne, 2017.

All proceeds from the purchase of Song For Elijah (Wrap Our Arms Around You) will go towards supporting Elijah’s family.


Always antifascist #161

Always antifascist #161

On this weeks program we tackle racism and the socially inappropriate practice of black-face fancy dress. Also policing and police brutality and fascism.

The major story this week is the closing down of the Manus Island detention center which has left 615 men stranded parched and hungry. They are also fearful of attacks by PNG police, military or hostile locals.





A NSW police policy the Suspect Target Management Plan (STMP) is causing harm instead of predicting and preventing crime as it is designed to do.

These are the findings of a report by the Youth Justice Coalition.

Police calculate a person’s future risk of offending and put them into a category of extreme, high, medium or low risk. Those on the STMP are singled out for attention, including being repeatedly detained and searched while going about their everyday lives.

People are being stopped and searched several times a week`, and visited at home sometimes late at night for no specific reason.

Dr Vicki Sentas author of the report believes STMP interventions are often based on discriminatory assumptions, raising serious issues around procedural and substantive justice.

She says the policy appears to disproportionately target young Aboriginal people.

The STMP can involve police harassment of those under ten which increases their contact with the criminal justice system while not showing any observable impact on crime.

Evidence that curtailing proactive policing can reduce major crime

The US and United Kingdom are calling on the Kenyan Government to investigate alleged police brutality against National Super Alliance demonstrators and prosecute those found culpable.

Kenyan security agencies are accused of using excessive use of force against protesters, including use of live bullets in Kisumu, Migori and Kibera in Nairobi.

In a statement, the US Ambassador to Kenya Robert Godec and UK minister for Africa Rory Stewart call for investigations into the allegations of police brutality against demonstrators in the immediate aftermath of the repeat presidential election which was held last week.

Black Lives Matter Founders Meet Indigenous Australians

Black Face.

WORST IGNORANT COMMENT EVER – People also sit on the beach to change their skin colour, but would you call them racist? No. But technically, they are changing their skin colour..

‘Blackface has frequently been used to perpetuate demeaning stereotypes of people of colour and symbolises how people who are not white have been represented as “the other”. It is widely seen as a form racism.

At its heart, “blackface” is about power. Specifically, using one’s power to take something important from someone else and use it for ridicule or entertainment. ‘

Black face stems from when black people were slaves and was designed to laugh at black people because they were considered lesser.

Queen Antyfa’s Report

In a BiZaRR0 interview with news dot com dot au, local comic Shayne Hunter has announced his retirement as CEO of ANTIFA (‘I established a terror movement in Australia, and I quit’, Shayne Hunter, as told to Corrine Barraclough,, October 24, 2017: ‘SHAYNE Hunter established the far-left and violent Antifa movement in Australia. After four years the Brisbane man quit. Here’s why.’).

Media watch report

East Coast Australia Anti Fascist Action Groups Statement has recently published an article by right-wing writer Corrine Barraclough, interviewing the self-described founder of the “Antifa” movement in Australia.

It goes without saying that anti-fascist movements have existed in this country for many, many decades previous to this person’s involvement in “far-Left” politics, and that their account of their own participation is delusional.

In reality, after being excluded from numerous leftist spaces in Australia due to his erratic behaviour and a history of sexual assault, we have seen this individual move towards a right-wing politics; one which better suits his hateful narratives about gender-diverse people, people of colour, and women.

Our advice to comrades would be to avoid this individual. Our advice to the media would be to apply even the smallest grain of salt when reporting on fantastical claims. Anybody with a genuine interest in the origins and history of anti-fascism would be advised to consult Mark Bray’s Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook (Melbourne University Press, 2017).

Teacher Outcry at Students Detention


Brisbane teachers have taken “historic” industrial action in their campaign to release an asylum-seeking high school student from a detention centre.

More than 50 teachers from Yeronga State High School, including principal Terry Heath, staged the strike in support of 21-year-old Mojgan Shamsalipoor on Tuesday afternoon.

Asylum seeker Ms Shamsalipoor was months away from graduating at the school when a failed visa application saw her forcibly removed from the Brisbane Immigration Transit Accommodation Centre in August and taken to a Darwin detention centre.

A spokeswoman for immigration minister Peter Dutton says he stands by the authorities’ decision to refuse the student refugee status and she should be deported.

“This is historic action,” said teacher Jessica Walker, who is leading the campaign to free Ms Shamsalipoor.

“Teachers have taken industrial action because of human rights abuses for the first time.

“It’s hugely significant and it’s only the beginning.”

After being refused refugee status, campaigners are now asking for Mr Dutton to allow Ms Shamsalipoor, who married fellow student Milad Jafari, also 21, to apply for a partner visa without the need to return to her native Iran.

“He has the power to do that and we urge him to do the right thing,” Ms Walker added.

Ms Shamsalipoor arrived illegally (sic – it is not illegal to seek asylum) in Australia by boat in 2012 after fleeing Iran to escape sexual abuse and an arranged marriage to a man in his 60s.

Dozens of students joined their teachers in a rally outside the school to call for the release of Ms Shamsalipoor, who managed to complete her year 12 studies from the detention centre with the help of the school.

In a speech directed at Mr Dutton, 17-year-old Eden Boyd said: “As young Australians we feel betrayed by the injustice of this situation.”

MP Mark Bailey said he supported the community campaign and has urged Mr Dutton to grant a visa to the student, who fears she will be killed if she returns to Iran.

AAP Photos by Mark Gillespie

freemojgan_2 freemojgan_3




I could just about call every show we do FUCK THE POLICE and this one is no exception… but it goes without saying these days right? and the flying Greek Anarchists is a truly inspiration story.



The show kicks off with April 29 1992 … a song about the riots in the aftermath of the acquittal of 4 people officers for the (video taped) beating of Rodney King.

There are riots all over America at the moment as communities rise up and express their discontent at yet more cases of police brutality (and fatalities) in which the officers involved are not held responsible for their conduct.

This song I think is the song for these times… especially the chorus ‘It’s about coming up and staying on top …. And screaming 187 on a motherfuckin’ cop’

Not that I would suggest violence…. just self defense.

The reason why the flying anarchists were hurling molotov cocktails (and a fridge!) was the hunger strike of Niko Romanos and the anniversary of the police murder of Alexandros Grigoropoulos in December 2008 .

In Greece they say ‘remember, remember the sixth of December’

Romanos was the best friend of Alexandros Grigoropoulos and Alexis died in his arms, this event radicalised Romanos.


He is serving time in prison for a bank robbery which targeted one of the banks that was never brought to account for its part in Greek’s economic woes.

“What is the robbing of a bank compared to the founding of a bank?” (Bertolt Brecht)

His hunger strike ended last week when the Greek government gave in to his demand for access to education.

Below is an excerpt from a text written by Romanos about hunger strikes.

A hunger strike is the ultimate means of struggle of a revolutionary individual. Historically it has been used by a wide political spectrum of fighters held hostage for their subversive action, mainly against democratic regimes.

From the dead hunger strikers of the r.o. Red Army Faction (RAF) and the deaths of the fighters of the IRA and ETA, up to the successful hunger strikes of anarchist comrades such as Christophoros Marinos and Kostas Kalaremas, the members of Revolutionary Struggle and the CCF. Points in common can be minimal to non-existent, but there is a decision which remains the same, “I am fighting to the end.”

This decision has been capable of creating specific blackmail against the State. Blackmail which, as paradoxical as it might sound, has gained important power of negotiation because of the dead hunger strikers.

And right at the end of the show we interview Steve Towson about his new song Christmas Island . Which is a fundraiser for the Asylum Seeker Resource Center.


Riot grandpa



Here’s a mix I put together for Outlawzzz Radio which airs 10-12 midnight also on 4ZZZ Brisbane.



Marcel CartierRight to Rebel



Mic RighteousDon’t it Make you wonder (freedom for Palestine)




ΕΞΤΑΣΗ ΤΕΑΜ – ΑΝΤΑΡΣΙΑ  (Examination Team – Mutiny)

εΜεS ~ The Government is Corrupt

Agripnos feat. Kiknio Asma, PWe are Strangers Everywhere

DDM – Total Destruction of Capitalism




Dr Dre – Murder Ink


Scott Morrison may gloat but asylum seekers’ boats haven’t really stopped


The Guardian

Two facts emerge as the UNHCR meets in Geneva to look at protection for refugees at sea: more people than ever are fleeing their country by boat, and deterrence doesn’t stop them…

For all the slogans and military operations, over 54,000 people have boarded boats across the Indian Ocean this year, with around 20,000 in just the two months of October and November. As much as Scott Morrison may gloat, the boats haven’t really stopped.

The point you won’t see on any media release or hear at a doorstop press conference is this: even if people haven’t drowned on the way to Australia, they’ve still drowned. Because people fleeing countries in the region are still getting on boats.

There are many inconvenient facts for those who won’t stop talking about stopping the boats. But perhaps the facts are not so bothersome if they aren’t on the nightly news. After all, if an asylum seeker drowns well enough away from Australian territorial waters, will there be a leadership challenge today? And have you seen Julie Bishop’s broach?

For the rest of us, here are some details.

According to the UNHCR report on Irregular Maritime Movements in South-East Asia, over 50,000 people set sail just from the Bay of Bengal area in January-November 2014. The smugglers operating in the region move people who are trafficked as well as those paying for passage outside of legal migration channels. The latter includes people such as ethnic Rohingya who do not have any nationality (and therefore no official travel documentation) and have a long history of persecution and discrimination by the Burmese government.

The UNHCR estimates that around 21,000 people have departed from the Bangladesh-Burmese maritime border in the two months of October and November 2014. About 10% were women, and around one-third of arrivals interviewed by UNHCR in Thailand and Malaysia were minors. The numbers for October 2014 are a marked increase (37%) from the year before.

And not all the deaths at sea are merely from drowning, according to the report:

“One in every three interviewees said at least one other passenger on their boat died en route; one in every 10 said 10 or more people died on board. Deaths were attributed to severe beatings by the crew, lack of food and water, illness, and heat.”

Globally, around 350,000 people have risked it all by taking a boat this year. On 10-11 December 2014, UNHCR is hosting a meeting looking specifically at protection at sea. The non-governmental organisations taking part have recommended, among other things, that to implement effective protection and ensure safety at sea, it is vital to “address ‘route causes’ and ‘root causes’ of forced and dangerous migration”.

UNHCR notes that these reasons for irregular movement include: conflict and war, protracted refugee situations, statelessness, the absence or inadequacy of protection systems, family separation, poverty and economic inequality.

What is notably absent from all the recommendations to “stop the boats” from these experts is deterrence, which in Morrison’s parlance is also known as “taking the sugar off the table”. This was of course the honourable minister’s reasoning last month for reducing the number of refugees Australia would resettle from Indonesia and banning those who registered with UNHCR in Indonesia after 1 July 2014 from ever getting to Australia.

Sweet though that poison may be (and poisonous is certainly how one can characterise the way Australia treats those who come across the sea), no refugee is paying a people smuggler for any sort of benefit other than getting the hell out of the hell they were in.

At the opening of the UNHCR meeting yesterday, the High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres said, “You can’t stop a person who is fleeing for their life by deterrence, without escalating the dangers even more”.

So what would work to actually stop people getting on boats? Again, according to the NGO recommendations, practical solutions for preventing irregular migration by sea include:

More opportunities for legal migration
Cooperative international agreements by states to provide more safe-havens for asylum seekers, e.g., through expanded UNHCR resettlement programmes; and
Migration and asylum policies that recognise the benefits of migration and the contributions of migrants and refugees to the development of countries of destination and origin.

It’s ultimately pretty simple and obvious: the key to reducing irregular movement of people by dangerous ways is to increase pathways for properly managed, safe and regulated movement. It involves as Guterres said, “looking at why people are fleeing, what prevents them from seeking asylum by safer means”.

In practice, nobody is going to be able to neatly pack their passport and customs declarations cards in order to flee discrimination or state persecution in a “regular” way. Which is why, in the case of those people, the Refugees Convention set up a system for countries around the world to join forces to help them, and why the UNHCR’s resettlement process allows for countries to accept refugees who cannot return to where they fled. Both of which the Australian government is slowly but surely repudiating.

Opening and expanding legal channels for migration and the movement of asylum seekers and refugees will reduce the use of smugglers and black-market operations. But for various reasons it’s doubtful Australia would be checking off anything on that list of solutions any time soon.

And so the boats will sail on, but just a little further off Morrison’s horizon.