Rojava, Italy, Brisbane, with Love.

Rojava, Italy, Brisbane, with Love.

This show really is global. We have contributors and interviewees on most major continents.

This show is an example our global footprint.  An Italian Subversion team member connected us with a man who had fought with the People’s Protection Unit (YPG) in Syria. This interview is our main feature this week.

It might come as a surprise but we also have an interview with Donald Trump. We find out his answers to some pressing issues.

And Bad Cop No Donut with some shocking cases of police brutality.

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MUSIC

ANTI-FLAG        …………..     Underground Network

ALAS                       …………………………..                                  Cop Killer

AZIZ WAISI      ……………………………       Kurdish song

DDM                        …………………………..                   Class War

POOR PEOPLE                 ………………………………………                   Sold Ourselves

Featured Image – Love Birds for Kurdistan

Anarchist Solidarity

Anarchist Solidarity

Jock Palfreeman has been in jail in Bulgaria for about 10 years. Inside the prison he set up the Bulgarian Prisoners Association and campaigns for human rights inside the countries harsh prisons. We interview two anarchists who work to support Jock and keep his case in the public eye.

Bad Cop No Donut begins with a funny issue Victorian police are having with their uniforms, and we discuss the on going situation in Australia’s offshore detention centre on PNG’s Manus Island.

And the big announcement that we are now part of the Channel Zero Network of anarchist podcasts.

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Music

Heaven 17 – Fascist Groove Thing info
The Basics – The Lucky Country info
Phil Monsour – Who Killed Reza Berati? info
Chumbawamba – Give the Anarchist a Cigarette info

 

Words

Jock Palfreeman petition (you don’t have to be Australian to sign)

Jock’s latest text.

Bad Cop No Donut

Victorian police officers have called for new pants after reporting their current uniforms are splitting at the crotch when they are trying to arrest people.

Police Association Victoria secretary Wayne Gatt said members had reported poor-quality and ill-fitting pants.

“The material used in manufacturing the pants is particularly unpopular with members, who have advised that the material does not breathe, and that the pants cause excessive sweating particularly in summer,” he said.

Mr Gatt said some officers had complained the excessive sweating had caused them medical problems.

He said the trousers limited police movements when they were trying to make arrests.

“Our members tell us that the cut of the pants limit their movement when they are required to execute some of the defensive techniques they are trained to perform, and are particularly limiting when they are required to complete routine policing tasks, such as jumping fences,” he said.


Western Australian police have released a promotional video made  to publicise its “Goodbye Graffiti” campaign.

The video has gone viral but for all the wrong reasons or maybe that was the plan.

It depicts a young couple walking through the streets of the inner-city Perth suburb of Leederville and buying coffee.

“Thank you so much for today — what’s the special occasion?” the woman asks.

“Remember those guys who were tagging the bus stop?” her companion says, as the video cuts to a scene of youths spray painting a bus shelter as sinister music plays.

“I got sick of them doing it and tagging, so I reported them,” he says. “I didn’t realise it, we got a reward.”

The WA Police campaign offers rewards for those who provide information about people who graffiti, in an attempt to save some of the estimated $25 million graffiti removal costs the State annually.


Victorian police take almost twice as many sick days now than they did 2 years ago.

Breaking down the stigma of mental health problems within the force has been suggested as a cause of this with more police feeling as if they can reach out for help.

The Victorian Police Association also noted the community’s continual mistreatment of law enforcers on the beat.


Refugees

For Manus updates follow Behrouz Boochani on Twitter.

Can’t Stand By

cantstandby

The Can’t Stand By network exists to make the Australian government’s regime of mandatory detention of refugees so economically, politically and socially expensive that they have no choice but to abandon this policy.
CSB is designed such that it will continue to operate until all offshore detention centres have been closed, the worst of the Australian onshore detention centres have been closed and there is a 30-day limit placed on detention in Australia with periodic judicial review of any detention after that. CSB will continue to apply pressure until these demands are not just an agreement but an operating reality.

 

Always antifascist #161

Always antifascist #161

On this weeks program we tackle racism and the socially inappropriate practice of black-face fancy dress. Also policing and police brutality and fascism.

The major story this week is the closing down of the Manus Island detention center which has left 615 men stranded parched and hungry. They are also fearful of attacks by PNG police, military or hostile locals.

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MUSIC

WORDS

A NSW police policy the Suspect Target Management Plan (STMP) is causing harm instead of predicting and preventing crime as it is designed to do.

These are the findings of a report by the Youth Justice Coalition.

Police calculate a person’s future risk of offending and put them into a category of extreme, high, medium or low risk. Those on the STMP are singled out for attention, including being repeatedly detained and searched while going about their everyday lives.

People are being stopped and searched several times a week`, and visited at home sometimes late at night for no specific reason.

Dr Vicki Sentas author of the report believes STMP interventions are often based on discriminatory assumptions, raising serious issues around procedural and substantive justice.

She says the policy appears to disproportionately target young Aboriginal people.

The STMP can involve police harassment of those under ten which increases their contact with the criminal justice system while not showing any observable impact on crime.

Evidence that curtailing proactive policing can reduce major crime


The US and United Kingdom are calling on the Kenyan Government to investigate alleged police brutality against National Super Alliance demonstrators and prosecute those found culpable.

Kenyan security agencies are accused of using excessive use of force against protesters, including use of live bullets in Kisumu, Migori and Kibera in Nairobi.

In a statement, the US Ambassador to Kenya Robert Godec and UK minister for Africa Rory Stewart call for investigations into the allegations of police brutality against demonstrators in the immediate aftermath of the repeat presidential election which was held last week.


Black Lives Matter Founders Meet Indigenous Australians


Black Face.

WORST IGNORANT COMMENT EVER – People also sit on the beach to change their skin colour, but would you call them racist? No. But technically, they are changing their skin colour..

‘Blackface has frequently been used to perpetuate demeaning stereotypes of people of colour and symbolises how people who are not white have been represented as “the other”. It is widely seen as a form racism.

At its heart, “blackface” is about power. Specifically, using one’s power to take something important from someone else and use it for ridicule or entertainment. ‘

Black face stems from when black people were slaves and was designed to laugh at black people because they were considered lesser.


Queen Antyfa’s Report

In a BiZaRR0 interview with news dot com dot au, local comic Shayne Hunter has announced his retirement as CEO of ANTIFA (‘I established a terror movement in Australia, and I quit’, Shayne Hunter, as told to Corrine Barraclough, news.com.a, October 24, 2017: ‘SHAYNE Hunter established the far-left and violent Antifa movement in Australia. After four years the Brisbane man quit. Here’s why.’).

Media watch report

East Coast Australia Anti Fascist Action Groups Statement

news.com.au has recently published an article by right-wing writer Corrine Barraclough, interviewing the self-described founder of the “Antifa” movement in Australia.

It goes without saying that anti-fascist movements have existed in this country for many, many decades previous to this person’s involvement in “far-Left” politics, and that their account of their own participation is delusional.

In reality, after being excluded from numerous leftist spaces in Australia due to his erratic behaviour and a history of sexual assault, we have seen this individual move towards a right-wing politics; one which better suits his hateful narratives about gender-diverse people, people of colour, and women.

Our advice to comrades would be to avoid this individual. Our advice to the media would be to apply even the smallest grain of salt when reporting on fantastical claims. Anybody with a genuine interest in the origins and history of anti-fascism would be advised to consult Mark Bray’s Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook (Melbourne University Press, 2017).

ANARCHY vs DEMOCRACY

ANARCHY vs DEMOCRACY

In this jam packed show we cover police violence, refugee news and we talk about and hear from the guy who head butted Tony Abbott.

The featured audio for this week is a talk by Barbara Hart regarding anarchism and democracy.

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We also announce this big news from Sub.media.

MUSIC

Laceration Mantra – Victims of Hate info
Corporate Avenger – Christians Murdered Indians info
Lavish – Homosapien info
Impossible Odds feat Georgia Corowa – Everything Odds info
Penny Dreaduls – Straight to the Golden Arches info
Chumbawamba – Give the Anarchist a Cigerette info

shirtfrontastrolabe

NSW Police May Soon Get Wide Reaching Powers

nojusticejustus

There’s the good old saying there is no justice there is just us.

And it’s going to ring more true in NSW with this new piece of legislation is described as ‘one of the most horrifying attacks on ordinary people’s rights, and most sinister overreaches of police power the state has seen’ by Techly mag.

We in Queensland should be worried because it might just slip over the border if it proves to be successful.

Indeed measures introduced in the United Kingdom through the Serious Crimes Act 2007 (recently expanded to Scotland), have ‘influenced‘ the NSW Bill.

The legislation will give police the power to cut off your internet, terminate your employment, tell you who can associate with, and where you can go if they think you have some association with a “serious” crime.

The NSW Bar association says ‘ The potential for interference in the liberties of citizens of New South Wales and their day to day lives is extreme.’

THE NSW GOVERNMENT WANTS TO GIVE POLICE DRACONIAN NEW POWERS AND YOU SHOULD BE TERRIFIED

CRIMES (SERIOUS CRIME PREVENTION ORDERS) BILL 2016 – NSW Bar Association

NSW crime prevention orders an attack on individual freedoms, rule of law: Bar Association

 

Indigenous Australia knows the cynicism exposed by Michael Brown’s killing in Ferguson

By Larissa Behrendt an academic, writer, film maker and Indigenous advocate

After a Missouri grand jury declined to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the killing of Michael Brown, prosecuting attorney Bob McCulloch said that the decision was based upon physical and scientific evidence, not “public outcry or political expediency”.

This call for objectivity does little in a situation where autopsies show Wilson had shot Brown at least six times, twice in the head. McCulloch seemed to compromise his own objectivity by blaming social and news media for beating up a story, rather than acknowledging that when a young person is shot by law enforcement, people expect a level of accountability.

Watching the events in Ferguson unfold raises similar questions about Australia’s own legal system. The parallel is immediately drawn with the failure to secure a conviction in the case of 36-year-old Cameron Mulrunji Doomadgee, who died in a Palm Island lockup over 10 years ago.

Mulrunji was picked up for singing “Who let the dogs out” at a police officer, Chris Hurley, who drove past him in the street. He was charged with public nuisance. He had been in police custody for only an hour when he died. An autopsy revealed four broken ribs, which had ruptured his liver and spleen.

Hurley was indicted for assault and manslaughter but acquitted in 2007. He is the only person ever charged over a death in custody of an Aboriginal person in Australia.

Emotions overflowed after Doomadgee’s death in custody. A riot broke out on Palm Island. It was, like in Ferguson, as much a protest against a single act of injustice as against a system that seemed riddled with it. No police officer was ever successfully prosecuted for Doomadgee’s death, but several Aboriginal men, including Palm Island spokesperson Lex Wotton, were successfully prosecuted for the ensuing riots and received a seven year prison sentence.

Would it have been realistic to expect this outcome on Palm Island? The Ferguson grand jury’s decision certainly seems to have been anticipated on social media, reflecting the persistence of deep cynicism about the criminal justice system.

Anyone who has lived in the US – or even visited – will notice that poverty is racialised. 15.1% of Americans live in poverty; of that 28.4% were black and 26.6% were Hispanic. The events in Ferguson are perhaps a way of highlighting that the election of Barack Obama has done little or nothing to change the US’s deeply ingrained cultures of exclusion, marginalisation and stereotyping.

Obama’s response to the eruption of a new wave of violence, and the broader disappointment and anger about the grand jury decision, showed his own understanding of the perceptions of bias in the legal system. His call to respect the rule of law was accompanied by pleas for calm and constructive protest; then-Queensland premier Peter Beattie struck a similar tone after Hurley was acquitted, urging Queenslanders “to accept the decision of the court without question.”

 A rally in Brisbane following the police murder of Mulrinji Doomadgee 2004

Obama also admitted that there were legitimate grounds for mistrust of the police, including that white police officers are seen to get away with killing young black men, while young black men seem to have no problem getting locked up. According to US Department of Justice figures from 2009, African Americans make up 40% of the US male prison population.

These patterns are replicated in Australia. Between 2000 and 2013, the adult Indigenous imprisonment rate increased by 57%, while the non-Indigenous rate did not show significant change. The rate of juvenile detention sits at about 24 times that of non-Indigenous youth. Indigenous people make up just 3% of the Australian population.

There are dozens of instances where Aboriginal people are killed in custody. The 1987 Royal Commission into Aboriginal deaths in custody investigated 99 of them. Since then, 340 Indigenous people have died in custody.

Some of these have been high profile. In 2008, respected Elder Mr Ward died in the back of a paddy wagon, after being driven 400km across the WA desert. He had been arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol.

More recently, 22-year-old woman Ms Dhu died in police custody in the South Hedland police station while she was being held in police custody to “pay down” around $1,000 in unpaid fines.

These deaths accumulate to cause a similar level of distrust with a legal system, particularly in the way it administers justice. Other than the unsuccessful prosecution of Chris Hurley, not a single charge has been laid, not a single person held to account. To return to McCulloch, is the long-term failure of African Americans and Indigenous Australians by their legal systems not also an “objective” reality?

While there is much talk about why violence occurs in this context, it also raises the more profound and long-reaching question: what will we do to fix a system where cynicism is rife and racial bias seems to abound? How do we change a conversation when there is suspicion that the system is stacked against the marginalised, and the powerful are defensive about being critiqued.

If there is a shining answer to this problem, it’s the Aboriginal community of Redfern. Riots erupted there in 2004 when TJ Hickey, a 17-year old Aboriginal man, was killed. After police chased him in their car while he was riding his bike, he was impaled on a fence. Hickey’s death sparked an emotional response from a community that had long been targeted by the police. Violence broke out and was eventually beaten back by police with fire hoses; law enforcement were castigated by the Sydney Morning Herald for their poor preparation.

Perhaps nothing was unusual about the situation in Redfern. What was unusual was the longer-term response. Police command changed and the new officer in charge, Commander Luke Freudenstein, built a relationship with the local community. A range of programs to build self-esteem in young people, particularly young men, were a success. As a result of this grassroots effort, the community transformed and far fewer young Indigenous men were arbitrarily picked up by the police, to end up in the lockup.

The lesson isn’t that good can come from civil unrest, so much as that change really is possible, if we address the issues that lead to outbursts of emotion and violence.

As the events in Ferguson unfold, it’s clear that their community is a microcosm of the deep-seated issues in the US. Ferguson is perhaps also a sign of what happens anywhere that key institutions, like the criminal justice system, are unreflective about their own entrenched biases – biases that colour outcomes when justice is what we need most.

Originally posted at Guardian Australia.